Category Archives: Photos–old

Bradley Warehouse, Inc., 1948-1978

The 1957 B. & P. W. scrapbook contains a brief history of the Bradley Warehouse, Inc., which is reprinted here:

“In 1918, M. M. Hamner, Sr., J. B. Edwards and L. B. Hamner formed a partnership to operate a cotton warehouse.  Using their own capital, they erected three sheet-iron buildings, 75’ x 140’.  Later they sold some stock to Charley Smith and W. T. Murphy, Jr.  The warehouse was in operation until the outbreak of World War No. 2 and, because of conditions peculiar to those times, such as labor shortage, etc., it was decided to close down the business.

In December, 1948, M. M. Hamner, J. B. Edwards, L. B. Hamner, W. T. Murphy, Jr., and F. M. Cochran, who bought the interest of Charles Smith, held a meeting and decided to reactivate the warehouses, form a Corporation under the laws of the State of Arkansas known as Bradley Warehouse, Inc., and Government Bond it.  With an additional investment of $25,000.00, all local capital, the three existing warehouses were completely repaired, inside and out.  A 128’ well was put down, a 25,000 gallon water tank was erected and all buildings were equipped with sprinkler systems.  The Government approved the warehouse for the storage of 5,000 bales of cotton.

In 1953, it became quite evident that the three houses could not take care of the cotton to be stored, and in the fall of that year, an 80’ x 140’ galvanized Butler building was erected at a cost of $25,000.  This, too, was equipped with a sprinkler system.  The Government increased the approval to 7,000 bales.

These four buildings, however, soon proved inadequate to take care of the cotton crop and early in 1956, a sheet-iron extension of 200’ was added to warehouse No. 2, at a cost of around $35,000.00.  Another 60,000 gallon tank was erected and 4 outside hydrants were placed.  A sprinkler system was also installed in this building, and approval was increased to 9,000 bales of cotton.”

– – – – –

Such was the state of Bradley Warehouse, Inc., in 1957.  In 1978, Bradley Warehouse, Inc., sold its physical plant to Farmers-Merchants Warehouse & Storage Co., Inc., a Louisiana corporation with principal offices in Plain Dealing, and the corporation itself was liquidated shortly thereafter.  According to the Lafayette County Tax Assessor’s records, the real property is now owned by Southern Arkansas Warehouse & Gin, L. L. C., an Arkansas limited liability company.

– – – – –

Shown below is a photo from the 1957 B. & P. W. scrapbook, showing the physical plant.  Immediately below it is a photo taken from approximately the same place and angle on October 14, 2008.

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The most obvious difference in the two photos is, of course, the disappearance of one of the 1957 water tanks. Also, in the 1957 photo, the street has not yet been paved.

Shown below are three photos from the 1957 B. & P. W. scrapbook of some of the activities and employees of the Warehouse at that time.

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If any reader should recognize any of these men, I would very much appreciate an e-mail or comment to that effect, and would gladly add their names to this post.

Bradley High School Football, 1930s

Bradley indeed had a football team in the 1930s, but I don’t know the precise year that the football program of that era began, or the precise year that it ended.

Below is a photo of one of those Bradley football teams, probably in the early 1930s.  The tall young man in the back row, second from left, with his left hand on his hip is Ralph C. “Bruz” Hamner.  If any reader is able to identify any of the rest of these formidable gridiron gladiators, it would be much appreciated.

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Shown below is an announcement of a game against Lewisville.  A date and time for the game are given, but the year is unknown.  While this may appear to be a handbill which would be posted on a utility pole, or something similar, it is actually a small card about twice the size of today’s business cards.

Saturday, January 31, 2004 (73) A

It says:

“FOOTBALL

Bradley Hi

vs.

Lewisville Hi

Wednesday, Nov. 23

Bradley Athletic Field

Come out and see the Bears drub the Red Devils in the last big game of the season.  Watch those Bears pull those Red Devil tails.

Admission 10 and 25c.  Time 3 P. M.”

– – –

The diaries of Della Cochran make mention of four home games in 1931 and 1932. On September 25, 1931, Bradley defeated Waskom, Texas, 27–0.  On October 2, 1931, Bradley defeated St. John’s, 19–0.  Who “St. John’s” was is a mystery. From the two 1931 scores, it appears that team defense was quite good that year.

On October 28, 1932, Hope defeated Bradley, 12–6.   On November 4, 1932, Stamps defeated Bradley, 26–0, and the Stamps High School Band made an appearance.  From the two 1932 scores, it appears that offense was a problem for Bradley that year.

As for the eventual fate of the 1930s-era football program, I’ve heard tales of a bus or auto accident which injured some of the players on the way back home from an away game, causing the cancellation of the remainder of the season.  I don’t know what year that happened, but apparently the program was not resumed in the following year.

Four Bradley scenes, 1957

Here are four photos taken from the 1957 B. & P. W. scrapbook, each showing a different view of Bradley.  Following each 1957 photo is a photo taken from approximately the same place and angle on September 23, 2008.

The first is a photo taken at the intersection of Highway 160, Woodruff St., and Crabtree Lane.  It shows Baker Bros. Garage (the “Esso” sign on the left) and Hamner Implement Co.  In the current photo, the Bradley Medical Clinic, with the apartment buildings in the rear of the photo, is now located where Hamner Implement Co. appears in the 1957 photo.

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The second photo was taken on the Bradley school campus.  It shows what was then the gymnasium in the back of the left side of the photo, and the old high school building on the right side of the photo.  The “new” high school building is described and pictured prominently in the B. & P. W. scrapbook, so this would have been about the time the “new” high school building was constructed. It is possible that, when this photo was taken, the old high school building had been abandoned and was awaiting demolition.  When this 1957 photo is enlarged, 14 (!) buses can be counted.

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The third photo is taken from the westbound lane of Fourth St./Highway 160 approximately in front of where the Post Office would have been located at that time.  The sign hanging from the awning on the right side of the photo, just above the automobile, says “Kennedy Grocery.”  The discoloration in the top portion of the photo is from the age of the photo, and not from a threatening sky.

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The fourth photo is taken from what is now the interior of the Community State Bank, looking more or less east at the west wall of the Edwards Co. building and Fourth St./Highway 160.  Prior to the construction of the second Bank of Bradley building on this location, the Arkansas Highway Department used it as a storage facility for highway resurfacing materials and equipment.

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Dedication of Methodist Church Sanctuary, 1949

One of the most beautiful buildings in Bradley is the Bradley United Methodist Church sanctuary:

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This building was dedicated in 1949.  The following article appeared in the Lafayette County Democrat of Friday, May 13, 1949, and is reprinted here by permission.

“METHODIST CHURCH AT BRADLEY TO BE DEDICATED MAY 15TH

Sunday, May 15th, at 11:00 a.m., Bishop Paul B. Martin will dedicate Bradley’s new Methodist Church building.  He will be assisted in the service by Rev. J. M. Hamilton, District Superintendent, and several former pastors.  Rev. Edwin Keith will preside.

Mrs. J. M. Allen and Miss Hortense Hamiter will have charge of the music.  Dinner will be served on the lawn.

Mrs. J. W. Camp and Mabel McGill were appointed to select the committees for the occasion and have chosen the following:

Invitation—J. M. Allen, Mrs. J. W. Camp.

Worship—Miss Hortense Hamiter, Mrs. J. M. Allen, Mrs. J. W. Camp.

Reception—Mrs. W. A. McGee, Mrs. L. B. Hamiter, Mrs. Mabel McGill, J. B. Edwards.

Decoration—Mrs. Mabel McGill, Mrs. Ed O’Neal, Mrs. T. H. Dismukes.

Dinner—Mrs. George Davis, Mrs. L. G. Middlebrooks, Mrs. L. B. Hamner, Mrs. J. W. Meek, Jr.

Publicity—Mrs. Aletha Allen.

The church building was started in 1946, under the leadership of our pastor, Rev. M. E. Scott, and was completed in the summer of 1947.  The first service was held in it August 9, 1947, with Rev. M. E. Scott preaching and Rev. J. A. Simpson, pastor at that time, presiding.

The building is a brick veneer which cost approximately twenty thousand dollars.  It has a seating capacity of approximately one hundred and twenty-five, pastor’s study, seven Sunday school rooms and two rest rooms.

The building committee was comprised of the following members:  J. B. Edwards, J. W. Meek, L. E. Taylor, Lee Crabtree and J. M. Allen.

This summer marks the forty-sixth anniversary of the organization of the Methodist church here.

Plans for this church began to be formulated in the summer of 1902 by the late D. D. Hamiter.  The first step was to get a building site.  On September eleventh, 1902, an acre of ground was deeded to D. D. Hamiter, J. H. Hamiter, and T. J. Evans, trustees of the Walnut Hill Circuit of the Little Rock Conference, by the Red River Land Company for that purpose.  On December 3, 1904 an adjoining strip of land was deeded to them by T. J. Evans.

For some reason the organization of the church was not consummated until the summer of 1903, when the late Dr. J. L. Cannon graduated from Southern Methodist University and was sent here as a substitute for Rev. George N. Campbell.

The charter members of the church were Mrs. Lula Brock, Mrs. Lena Adams, Mrs. Lucy Ham, Mrs. Henry Hanson, Mrs. Dora Garner, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Price, D. D. Hamiter.  All have passed on except Mrs. Dora Garner, Mrs. Lula Brock and Mrs. Henry Hanson.

Under the direction of Dr. J. I. Cannon a frame building was started but was not ready for occupancy until the latter part of 1904.  In the meantime, preaching services were held one Sunday afternoon of each month in the Lodge Hall above what was known as Brock & Smith store and post office on Pilot Avenue.

During the left of the church the following ministers have served as pastors, J. L. Cannon, C. W. Musgrove, R. J. Roland, J. J. Mellard, R. J. Raiford, W. C. Hilliard, H. W. Hansford, M. K. Rogers, A. P. Flowers, Roy E. Fawcett, J. A. Save, G. W. Cannon, C. E. Whitten, R. R. Moore, A. W. Hamilton, M. E. Scott, J. A. Simpson, [and] Edwin Keith.  D. D. Hamiter served continuously on the board of Stewards from the Church’s organization until his death in 1931.

Under the leadership of Rev. Edwin Keith, last year, the old frame church building was converted into a lovely six room and bath parsonage.

During World War II, the church kept a list of all its members entering the services.  This list contains 34 names.  All the boys returned except one.

Sunday School has been held regularly since March, 1912.  Jack Meek is the present Superintendent.  The Sunday School assumed the responsibility of furnishing most of the parsonage when it was completed last year.

The W. S. C. S. was organized in 1920 and has met regularly since that time.  Mrs. J. B. Edwards was the first president.  The present incumbent is Mrs. F. P. Adams.  They have chosen as their special project the beautifying of the grounds of the church and parsonage.

The Methodist Youth Fellowship was organized in 1946.  Mrs. J. M. Allen is Superintendent of Youths’ Work.”

– – –

Below is an image of the cornerstone of the Bradley United Methodist Church:

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“BRADLEY METHODIST

CHURCH

ERECTED 1946

BUILDING COMM.

J. B. EDWARDS

J. W. MEEK

J. M. ALLEN

L. E. TAYLOR

LEE CRABTREE

PAUL E. MARTIN, BISHOP

A. J. CHRISTIE, DIST. SUPT.

M. E. SCOTT, PASTOR

LLOYD HELMS, CONT.”

Bradley Baptist Church, circa 1960

The image below, courtesy of Mrs. Marjorie Bishop, shows the Bradley Baptist Church after a snowstorm in 1960.  Following that image is a picture taken from approximately the same place and angle on the hot summer afternoon of July 6, 2008.

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The sanctuary in the top image was replaced by the one in the bottom image in 1963.  Below is a picture taken during that construction, which shows the old sanctuary moved to the rear of the property during that construction.  It continued to be used in its new location until the construction of the new sanctuary was completed.

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As is apparent, the colonnade between the educational building on the right side of the 1960 image was severed, then reattached to the new sanctuary when it was completed.

Sometimes history is right out in plain view, staring us in the face, and yet we seldom notice.  One example is cornerstones.  Although it is now partially obscured by a shrub, the cornerstone for the present (1963) sanctuary is shown below:

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It reads:

“BRADLEY BAPTIST

CHURCH

——-

ORGANIZED

JULY 30, 1902

THIS SANCTUARY

ERECTED 1963

‘JESUS CHRIST HIMSELF

BEING THE CHIEF CORNER

STONE’ EPH 2:20”

The building on the left side of the current (color) photo was completed in 1966.  Below is an image of its cornerstone:

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It reads:

“BUT GROW IN THE GRACE AND

KNOWLEDGE OF OUR LORD

AND SAVIOR JESUS CHRIST

II PETER 3:18

J. H. POWELL SR. PASTOR

F. M. COCHRAN SR, CLERK

J. G. ALLEN JR. TREAS.

J. B. WORKS TREAS.

DEACONS

HARVEY HANSFORD CH.

E. L. ADKINS

H. D. AMBROSE

H. C. BARNETT

L. C. THOMAS

E. V. POWELL”

There is an enclosed hallway between the rear (north) end of the 1963 sanctuary and the 1966 building which also has a cornerstone/commemorative marker, shown below:

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It reads:

“GO … MAKE DISCIPLES .. BAPTIZE .. TEACH

MATT 28: 19–20

ERECTED A. D. 1966

BUILDING COMMITTEE

*J. G. ALLEN III CHMN.        J. W. CRAIN. CO-CHMN.

*BILLY LEE ALLEN               H. M. BURKS

*H. C. BARNETT                 M. M. McCALMAN, SR.

*HARVEY HANSFORD           CLYDE JACKSON

*J. B. W0RKS                     L. C. THOMAS

*BUILDING FINANCE COMMITTEE”

– – – – – – – – – –

Again, thanks to Mrs. Marjorie Bishop for the use of the two black-and-white photos.

Downtown Bradley, late 1950’s

Shown below are four black-and-white photos taken in “downtown” Bradley, apparently in the 1950s.  I don’t know who took these photos, but they were apparently taken on the same roll of film.  The photos are actually copies of copies and, therefore, rather grainy, and one is slightly out of focus.  After each of these photos is a color photo taken from approximately the same location and angle on June 15, 2008.

The first photo is of Fourth Street (Highway 160).  The Coca-Cola sign on the building on the left says “J. M. Drake.”  The building on the left must have been demolished not very many years after this photo was taken.

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– – – – –

The second photo shows a group gathered around a ladder, perhaps, judging from the jackets some are wearing, putting up Christmas lights.  Again, the building in the background must have been demolished not very many years after this photo was taken.

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– – – – –

The third photo shows the view from just east of the railroad depot on Fourth Street/Highway 160, looking west.  It also shows what was then the front entrance to the depot.  The building in the background was demolished in 1978.

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– – – – –

The fourth and last photo shows the building in which George Bell later published the Bradley Pioneer for 16 years.  It was demolished in the mid-1980’s.  The Bradley Public Library was located in the right side of this building for many years.  The sign on the side of the building says, “Jones Plumbing and Electric.”  To the right of that building is Alvin Owens’ barber shop.

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– – – – –

These photos remind me of a book that, as a boy, I spent literally hours poring over at the Bradley Public Library.  It was a large (perhaps 24 inches by 30 inches) scrapbook or photograph album put together by the Bradley B. & P. W. Club.  It contained many, many wonderful photographs of Bradley as it appeared in the 1950s.  I’ve often wondered whatever happened to that scrapbook.  If any of the readers of this site know of its present location, I would be most interested to learn its whereabouts.

 

Lube’s Place, 1970

I received an e-mail from Bryan Whisenhunt, who says that, “One of the things I enjoyed and remember was Mr. Lube Middlebrooks’ place or restaurant….  I remember the old time hamburgers and fries were awesome.”  Everyone who ever ate at Lube’s Place would probably agree.  This is what Lube’s Place looked like in 1970:

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This 35mm slide film has begun to deteriorate.  The Coca-Cola sign says “Lube’s Place” and “Coffee Shop Used Furniture.”  It’s not readily visible from this photo, but there was a horseshoe, for good luck, across the top of the entry door facing.  This building was located on the northwest corner of Block 9.

As I recall, Mr. and Mrs. L. G. “Lube” Middlebrooks had this business for about 10 years, perhaps a little more.  Mrs. Ida was in charge of the cooking and Mr. Lube was in charge of the conversation.  Mrs. Ida passed away in 1979, and Mr. Lube died in 1984.

Shown below is how the building appeared 25 years earlier, on January 24, 1945, near the end of World War II.  I’m not entirely sure of the soldier’s name, so I won’t hazard a guess.

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Below is how the building appeared in 2001, shortly before it was demolished:

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And below is a photo taken from approximately the same place and angle as the 1970 photo earlier today, May 23, 2008:

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The tract is now occupied by the Bradley Fire Department’s building.

Whatever happened to … the Bradley Pioneer?

I recently received an e-mail from Buck Camp, who is the son of the late J. W. “Buck” Camp, Sr., longtime Mayor of Bradley about 40–50 years ago.  Buck asks:  “Does anyone know if any issues of the Bradley Pioneer newspaper, edited and published in the 1960s by George Bell … are in a library collection or if any still exist?”  The short answer to Buck’s question is an emphatic “Yes.”  And, like many parts of Bradley’s history, therein lies a tale…

George Bell, shown below in 1971, published the Bradley Pioneer from 1960 to 1976. The only two photographs I could find of George are not very good photos.  One is slightly out-of-focus and the other suffers from badly deteriorated 35mm slide film. 

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For almost all of the sixteen years the Pioneer was published, George prepared it on a Linotype machine.  The picture below is of very poor quality, but it shows George at work in 1968 on that cumbersome apparatus.

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A Linotype machine is just that.  The operator types in one line of type at a time.  The machine forms a mold for that line of type.  The machine then pours hot lead into the mold, which cools to make the actual print that is struck by the ink of the printing press.  Once done, the lead goes back into the hot lead pot to be melted and reused.

Shortly after George ceased publishing the Pioneer in 1976, the late Dr. John Ferguson, Executive Director of the Arkansas State History Commission, visited him.  Dr. Ferguson asked George if the History Commission could microfilm the issues of the Pioneer that George still had.  George replied that he was willing for the issues to be microfilmed, but that sorting sixteen years of issues would be next to impossible. 

I heard about Dr. Ferguson’s visit and its unsuccessful outcome, and volunteered to help George in the sorting of the back issues of the paper.  Perhaps the word “volunteer” isn’t entirely accurate, because I did demand one form of payment for my efforts.

George kept his back issues of the paper in the back room of his building.  Sixteen years of issues had been stacked haphazardly during that time into daunting piles, many of which were even taller than I am.  Apparently, George would place a few back issues of each week’s edition onto whatever pile was smallest.  This went on for sixteen years.  It was a rather large room, roughly 16 feet by 20 feet, and it was crammed with back issues.

For two very long days, George and I, with an assist from Ricky Kennedy, sorted back issues.  We got some saw horses and sheets of plywood and made makeshift tables for sorting.  We first sorted papers by year of publication and then by issue number.  Of course, most of the issues had many more copies than we needed. 

It turned out that George had saved all but 8 to 10 issues of the Pioneer published during those sixteen years.  Those were boxed up and Dr. Ferguson later picked them up, took them to Little Rock for microfilming, and returned them to George.  My “price” for assisting George in sorting the back issues was that he would give me the second most complete set.  There were about a half-dozen issues for which only one copy had been saved, so my set was missing around 15 issues total.

I later donated my set to the Southwest Arkansas Regional Archives, known as SARA, in Washington, Arkansas.  To the best of my knowledge, they are still there today and open to inspection by the public.  SARA’s web site is www.southwestarchives.com.  SARA is now a branch of the Arkansas State History Commission.

When I was last in the offices of the Arkansas State History Commission (www.ark-ives.com) in Little Rock about three years ago, an attendant showed me the four microfilm rolls of the Bradley Pioneer.  At that time, copies of each roll could be purchased for $75 each.  Like everything else, though, I suspect that the price has increased since that time.

Fourth Street, 1910s

Several previous posts have featured photos from Fourth Street (now Highway 160).  The following photo shows a gentleman whose identity is unknown, but who is obviously very well dressed, standing on Fourth Street in the 1910s.  That date is reasonably certain because of the album from which the photo was taken. 

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This photo is roughly contemporary with the photo on the header of this site and with the first photo in the 1/30/08 post which shows two people standing at the south entrance to the railroad depot.  The buildings in the background face the railroad, as did most of the early commercial buildings in Bradley.  It is difficult to discern, but there is no structure at all on the half-block behind the building at left, which would be where Coker Hardware is now located, and upon which a row of several buildings was later built and also demolished.

This photo is an almost 180–degree opposite view of Fourth Street from the photo in the post of 2/11/08.  The tinted photo of the kneeling man and his dog in that post was taken about 20 years later than this photo, however.

This photo is obviously, judging by the man’s shadow, taken in the late morning.  Below is a photo taken from approximately the same place and angle in the late morning of March 22, 2008.

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Winter Weather, late 1940s

This past Friday’s late-season snowfall sent me looking for old pictures of winter weather.  The earliest color picture I could find is the one below.  It was taken in the middle of Pullman street in front of where the Bradley Post Office is now located.  I’m less certain of the date it was taken than for many of the other pictures on this site, however.  The date of the late 1940s was arrived at by weighing that (1) this is early color slide film, and (2) the date of the vehicles in the photo, one of which is only partially visible, and shows clearly only at great magnification.

The photo:

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Below is a photo taken from approximately the same place and angle on the (much prettier) afternoon of March 9, 2008:

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